Work & Process
Austin Based
Physical–Digital
Product Designer
Work & Process
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set up a pretty little headless server today. going to utilize it as digital experimentation space.
set up a pretty little headless server today. going to utilize it as digital experimentation space.
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'Hardware is more like working with rock, while software is water.'
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Been digitizing some sketches for an internet of things project I’ve been working on for Mornings — Solid State Tomb: Internet of Death
Although the project has been primarily concerned with facilitating ‘New Death Cultures’ in the modern age, (resulting in ‘work’ that I’d barely call design work) I’ve taken time to bring back ethereal service-design and experience-design concepts into a form that actually resonates with people: Applications.
This is an app icon sketch for ‘Memory Card’, a service that allows the user to connect with passed-away loved ones’ leftover digital life-fragments. I’ll probably be writing about this in greater detail later.
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Introduction from Mornings on Vimeo.

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the current scene
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the current scene
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Note —
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brushing up, more in a bit
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I’ve been digitally sketching lots of b&w tiles lately — currently inspired by the product i’ve been working on during my day job, scientific flower drawings, technical schematics, and video game ads from the 90s.
I’ve been digitally sketching lots of b&w tiles lately — currently inspired by the product i’ve been working on during my day job, scientific flower drawings, technical schematics, and video game ads from the 90s.
I’ve been digitally sketching lots of b&w tiles lately — currently inspired by the product i’ve been working on during my day job, scientific flower drawings, technical schematics, and video game ads from the 90s.
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ibmblr:

Really? Really.
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"

I first encountered Amish-made clothing on a short trip to southern Pennsylvania, and was immediately struck by the warmth of the garments. “What could this be?” I wondered, as I felt the varying textures of patchwork fabric. Overcome with curiosity, I asked some nearby community members about the nature of these clothes, and was surprised to learn that the warmth I initially felt had come from the person who made the garment. It was born out of a deep caring for the person for whom it was made, most likely a family member or close friend. The happiness and love of the creator was tangibly manifested in the end product.

I realized that in order to create a product full of warmth, I myself had to be happy.

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Hiroki Nakamura
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shelf-shelf:

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started documenting the slow change of these two shelves I’ve recently put up. hoping to review shelved titles as they’re finished, but let’s see how simple recordings bode.
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taking it slow these days